Formlua 1 to race in Miami starting in 2022

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As announced by the official page of Formula 1 Sunday the 18th, Formula 1 will be coming to Florida at a brand new race track in 2022. 

 

The race track is going to be based around the Hard Rock Stadium and will include 19 corners with a variety of twists, chicanes,  hairpins, and long straights that will let cars reach top speeds of 320 km/h. 

 

With a length of 5.41 km the track is quite an average length for F1 standards. Just by looking at the track layout, which Formula 1 have posted on their official Instagram, it looks as the first sector will be the most technical one for drivers, and while the second sector will have some tight corners and a chicane (most likely), the huge straight between corners 8 and 11 will make it easier to drive. 

 

The third sector is composed of a long straight between turns 16 and 17 before turns 18 and 19 open up to a shorter straight where the pit lane will be located. F1 signed a 10 year contract with the city of Miami to host this Grand Prix, which means the MiamiGP is here for the long run.

 

What to expect from this track

 

The features of the track promise exciting racing with three potential DRS zones and many overtaking chances throughout the lap. It would have been rather disappointing to see such a track be developed last year because of the amount of dirty air the cars used to create from their wake, which made it really hard to have closer racing. Although the Miami track has plenty of corners which would make for boring racing due to the amount of dirty air that would be left off by the cars, the new regulations put in place for 2022 will minimize dirty air and make for much closer racing. 

 

Perhaps this is the reason why F1 have kept quiet about the possibility of racing in Miami until the contract was signed and the regulations were ready, as fans would better understand the plans of the organization.

 

Something unique about this track is the Hard Rock Stadium, from which the track unfolds and comes back around the other side. Tom Garfinkel told microphones that “you could walk around the top deck of the stadium and see every corner of the track”, making this the only track of its kind.