Free the Tampon

Free+the+Tampon

 Whether we like to admit it or not, women have special needs for which they need to buy products. When such products are exorbitantly priced, it can affect a women’s emotional state. Global news released an article outlining how women pay approximately $200 more a month than men do on essential hygiene products. Think about how much you make on an average monthly and then spending $200 a month on essential products like soap, shampoo, conditioner, tampons, pads, toilet paper. The list keeps going on and those are only the products that someone must have in order to attend school or work without being humiliated by a woman leaking or associated odour because she can’t afford the necessary products to prevent them. 

Scotland took the lead when the government passed a law on February 25th 2020 that stated women hygiene products like tampons and pads would be free in any public place such as schools, pharmacies, activity centres, and workplaces, purchasing such items was significantly, and unfairly, eating into personal budgets. Monica Lennon, the bill representative from Scotland said in a statement, “We are changing the culture and it is really exciting that countries right around the world are watching really closely to see what we do.”

I believe that if this new law was implemented everywhere it  would make life much easier for women and they wouldn’t have to face embarrassment in public. A women can’t control her menstral cycle and it’s unfair to make us pay big money for products that will help us when men don’t have much at all they need for hygiene other than their essentials that women also need on top of everything else. 

The Canadian government must be called upon to decrease the cost of feminine hygiene products and everyday essentials. They should follow Scotland’s lead.  This change would lead to improved women’s mental health and emotional security.

Let’s make essential feminine hygiene products cheaper for women to afford all around the world to better our society.  ”

— Tessa Bentley